Our Solutions

Systems Analysis for Our World

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@TEDChris Combine Consciousness and TED

    Chris Anderson as the curator at TED, I ask you to work with the Integral Institute to create Spiral Dynamics labels on your videos.  TED has been known to take a skeptical view of consciousness studies, having banned a TEDx talk earlier this year.  I understand this decision, as TED requires rigorous scientific vigor to be included in your curated content.  
    Spiral Dynamics is a study of consciousness development.  The original founders have laid out what variables make up each level of consciousness, it is a definable science.  TED’s collective of videos is TURQUOISE consciousness, which has been defined by Ken Wilber as Holistic . Universal holistic system, holons/waves of integrative energies; unites feeling with knowledge; multiple levels interwoven into one conscious system. Universal order, but in a living, conscious fashion, not based on external rules (blue) or group bonds (green). A “grand unification” [a “theory of everything” …] is possible, in theory and in actuality. Sometimes involves the emergence of a new spirituality as a meshwork of all existence. Turquoise thinking uses the entire Spiral”  
    According to this theory, systems, individuals, governments, corporations all can be classified as having connection to different vMEME structures.  There are no ‘boxes,’ instead the double helix of Spiral Dynamics is an ever evolving system.  TED videos all have different vMEME theses, and I feel that by placing a small label at the bottom of every TED video, you will lead the way to mankind operating on second tier consciousness.  TURQUOISE and YELLOW make up the second tier.  
"All of that begins to change with second-tier thinking. Because second-tier consciousness is fully aware of the interior stages of development—even if it cannot articulate them in a technical fashion—it steps back and grasps the big picture, and thus second-tier thinking appreciates the necessary role that all of the various memes play . Second-tier awareness thinks in terms of the overall spiral of existence, and not merely in the terms of any one level. "
    By having these labels on TED videos, we will a) awaken anyone who stumbles across them to the Spiral, and its possibilities, b) we will educate people on Spiral Dynamics, as once the video is over they will have a frame of reference as to what each color is.  For example, I would label Ron Finley’s talk on Guerilla Gardening GREEN orange.  He desires to actively spread the Green message of unity and growing his own food, and his urge to have everyone do this is orange. Steve Jobs “How to Live Before you Die" is a YELLOW thesis.   Sir Ken Robinson’s "Schools Kill Creativity" is a YELLOW testament on how to change education.  Since American education is ruled by ORANGE consciousness administrators..  The education talk can then lead individuals to the internal question, how can we get education leaders toward YELLOW thinking?  These ideas can plant seeds for problem solvers around the globe. 
    The YELLOW meme comes when one recognizes the existence of the Spiral and empathizes with people on different levels of the Spiral. YELLOW recognizes the Spiral within, as well as the Spiral around us at our jobs, in the TED videos we watch, in our governing institutions, in the companies we choose to support.  By labeling your curated content, you will help to rapidly lead mankind into second-tier thinking.
"With less than 2 percent of the population at second-tier thinking (and only 0.1 percent at turquoise), second-tier consciousness is relatively rare because it is now the "leading-edge" of collective human evolution. As examples, Beck and Cowan mention items that include Teilhard de Chardin’s noosphere, chaos and complexity theories, universal systems thinking, integral-holistic theories."
    By using Spiral Dynamics as a road map overlapped to TED’s curated content, let’s lead the narrative for mankind’s rise in consciousness.  Let’s Build the Future.  

(Spiral Dynamics® is a registered trademark of National Values Center, Inc.)

Filed under Chris Anderson TED Consciousness Spiral Dynamics

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RSA Insight - Where can technology take us? (by The RSA)

Digital Devices are a platform for a more collaborative evolution of our species.

1 note

The Circle Economy and Permaculture

Permaculture, as a word and a practice, seems so foreign to many entrepreneurs in NYC.  Working on the land appears to many as a step back in time to when humans were less civilized.  Permaculture is actually way to analyze systems, and the ideas and concepts mirror those of the Circle Economy.
The Circle Economy is a term thrown around at many international meetings, like the World Economic Forum at Davos and at the UN.  The concept is simple, the Earth is full of finite (limited) resources, so developing products and services with this concept in mind (and an underlying assumption of increased cost of future resources, due to an expected future scarcity) companies can be both profitable and utilize all their inputs and outputs.
Inputs are usually known in industry, but outputs (or wastes) are typically just thrown away.  Permaculturists call these outputs usable yield, and they encourage creating systems that naturally incorporate them.  Cirlce Economy experts have the same thesis.  
Let’s Build the Future.
*IV Overview of Ecosystems Thinking

Filed under IV Cirlce Economy Permaculture

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arc44:

Arc 44 and Social Security; Abundance in Retirement

“Growing your own food is like printing your own money”  Ron Finely

Growing up in an affluent suburb of Boston the idea of Social Security as a viable stream of revenue to live off of is laughable.  Many in my community, though not willing to give the money back, scoff at actually living on $12,000 a year.  With aging baby boomers moving into retirement at a rate of 8,000 people a day, the nation as a whole is wrestling with ideas on how to deal with this.  Since most Americans have not saved enough money to live ‘comfortably’ in retirement, many are scratching their heads at what to do.  

Living in community is the most viable solution.  When resources are pooled, they have a higher optimization.  When the aging population have ‘jobs’ (or labor credits) that challenge them just enough to stay active and vibrant, but allow for full integration into our community both socially and economically.  Much of our food will be grown on site, or produced in our aquaponics facility and chicken coops.  The businesses will pay for the basics in an ongoing way, loosening the strain on the collective.  If members become too aged and cannot do any labor, then they can subsidize their cost of living with social security.  The whole system handles itself, and we give the elderly a chance to live and flourish with dignity.  

We are seeking the flower children of the 1960’s.  The ones who saw this coming global change before we did, ‘the elders.’  By having a flourishing ecosystem of young people, older people, and even children, we showcase the natural cycle of life not seen in many of today’s isolated households.  We will give our ‘elders’ a chance to pass on their lifetime of knowledge to more than just their blood family; to their human family.

By having many cross sections of human life all living/ working together to create abundance, we also extend the ratings capacity for our docudrama television series.  This will increase the potential return on investment for our investor/ founders group, becoming a virtuous cycle for all involved with Arc 44.

Let’s Build the Future

*IX Living in Community

arc44:

Arc 44 and Social Security; Abundance in Retirement

Growing up in an affluent suburb of Boston the idea of Social Security as a viable stream of revenue to live off of is laughable.  Many in my community, though not willing to give the money back, scoff at actually living on $12,000 a year.  With aging baby boomers moving into retirement at a rate of 8,000 people a day, the nation as a whole is wrestling with ideas on how to deal with this.  Since most Americans have not saved enough money to live ‘comfortably’ in retirement, many are scratching their heads at what to do.  
Living in community is the most viable solution.  When resources are pooled, they have a higher optimization.  When the aging population have ‘jobs’ (or labor credits) that challenge them just enough to stay active and vibrant, but allow for full integration into our community both socially and economically.  Much of our food will be grown on site, or produced in our aquaponics facility and chicken coops.  The businesses will pay for the basics in an ongoing way, loosening the strain on the collective.  If members become too aged and cannot do any labor, then they can subsidize their cost of living with social security.  The whole system handles itself, and we give the elderly a chance to live and flourish with dignity.  
We are seeking the flower children of the 1960’s.  The ones who saw this coming global change before we did, ‘the elders.’  By having a flourishing ecosystem of young people, older people, and even children, we showcase the natural cycle of life not seen in many of today’s isolated households.  We will give our ‘elders’ a chance to pass on their lifetime of knowledge to more than just their blood family; to their human family.
By having many cross sections of human life all living/ working together to create abundance, we also extend the ratings capacity for our docudrama television series.  This will increase the potential return on investment for our investor/ founders group, becoming a virtuous cycle for all involved with Arc 44.
Let’s Build the Future

*IX Living in Community

Filed under IX Arc 44 Social Security

0 notes

How Corruption Is Strangling U.S. Innovation

"If there’s been one topic that has entirely dominated the post-election landscape, it’s the fiscal cliff. Will taxes be raised? Which programs will be cut? Who will blink first in negotiations? For all the talk of the fiscal cliff, however, I believe the US is facing a much more serious problem, one that has simply not been talked about at all: corruption. But this isn’t the overt, "bartering of government favors in return for private kickbacks" corruption. Instead, this type of corruption has actually been legalized. And it is strangling both US competitiveness, and the ability for US firms to innovate.

The corruption to which I am referring is the phenomenon of money in politics.”

*II Laying out the Problems Honestly

Filed under II Corruption in US politics Harvard Business Review

2 notes

Decentralized Complex Systems and the Occupy Movement
Occupy Wall Street began on September 15th 2011, and the basic idea was to steer the ‘national conversation’ in a direction more connected to reality.  As much as I dislike the meme of the ‘1 percent,’ calling out how wealth dynamics are skewed in this nation (and the world) makes statistical sense, with that 1% of the population controlling 40% of the world’s wealth.  The 1% did not keep this wealth via true capitalist ways; many market rules have been put in place that prevent the ‘invisible hand’ from executing efficiently.  That is what drew me to the movement.

What got me about Occupy wasn’t just the thought of ‘free love’ (I did not get laid at all during Occupy, unfortunately) but was actually how the entire ‘organism’ behaved.  The study of complex networks were on my mind perpetually, as I was working with a buddy from grad school on developing an iPhone app.  Technologists everywhere, like Fred Wilson (Yoda in technology Venture Capital,) and business incubators (like Y Combinator) have long used the mathematical framework of complexity science as a way to catapult their ideas into reality.  I did not anticipate these mathematical concepts would come to life in front of my eyes during OWS.

Self organizing systems have a unique flow about them, they do not move in a linear progression (from a clear point A to point B.)  Instead, these systems behave like cells in a biological organism.  Ant colonies share characteristics of a super organism when they combine themselves in groups of half a million; one ant does not have consciousness, but when many ants come together, their behavior is that of a cohesive organism with no leader or conductor.  Watching Occupy begin as a few pieces of bacteria in a petri dish blossom into a full blown super conscious organism, which fed more people in its tenure than all the soup kitchens in NYC combined,blew me away.  This was a real life case study in complexity science, in its benefits and pitfalls, and so few people could understand how to articulate that.  

As much faith I have in the shape and command and control capabilities that Occupy showed, I have equal skepticism in it’s execution.   Firstly, one the purpose of Occupy ‘be against’ our current system.  That intention can only be held for so long without being destabilized.  To learn from this, I would recommend a similar ‘container’ but recommend a clear vision for building, with no reason to be ‘against’ anything.  Secondly, to truly create an organism capable of ‘fixing’ many of our collective ills, one must include full transparency in its activities, especially financially.  I attempted to create an Audit Working Group, which would have served as a way to bring transparency to a very opaque financial allocation system, and was shot down by vested interests.  

The mathematics of Occupy were studied by many, and its execution was used previously by various black operations agents to destabilize other nation states.  These same mathematics can be used inversely to stabilize an entire nation state.  Biodiversity of our economic and political systems, combined with Open Source style transparency, can make our nation strong.  

Let’s stabilize our systems with biodiversity.  Let’s build the Future.

*III Complexity Science

Decentralized Complex Systems and the Occupy Movement

Occupy Wall Street began on September 15th 2011, and the basic idea was to steer the ‘national conversation’ in a direction more connected to reality.  As much as I dislike the meme of the ‘1 percent,’ calling out how wealth dynamics are skewed in this nation (and the world) makes statistical sense, with that 1% of the population controlling 40% of the world’s wealth.  The 1% did not keep this wealth via true capitalist ways; many market rules have been put in place that prevent the ‘invisible hand’ from executing efficiently.  That is what drew me to the movement.

What got me about Occupy wasn’t just the thought of ‘free love’ (I did not get laid at all during Occupy, unfortunately) but was actually how the entire ‘organism’ behaved.  The study of complex networks were on my mind perpetually, as I was working with a buddy from grad school on developing an iPhone app.  Technologists everywhere, like Fred Wilson (Yoda in technology Venture Capital,) and business incubators (like Y Combinator) have long used the mathematical framework of complexity science as a way to catapult their ideas into reality.  I did not anticipate these mathematical concepts would come to life in front of my eyes during OWS.
Self organizing systems have a unique flow about them, they do not move in a linear progression (from a clear point A to point B.)  Instead, these systems behave like cells in a biological organism.  Ant colonies share characteristics of a super organism when they combine themselves in groups of half a million; one ant does not have consciousness, but when many ants come together, their behavior is that of a cohesive organism with no leader or conductor.  Watching Occupy begin as a few pieces of bacteria in a petri dish blossom into a full blown super conscious organism, which fed more people in its tenure than all the soup kitchens in NYC combined,blew me away.  This was a real life case study in complexity science, in its benefits and pitfalls, and so few people could understand how to articulate that.  
As much faith I have in the shape and command and control capabilities that Occupy showed, I have equal skepticism in it’s execution.   Firstly, one the purpose of Occupy ‘be against’ our current system.  That intention can only be held for so long without being destabilized.  To learn from this, I would recommend a similar ‘container’ but recommend a clear vision for building, with no reason to be ‘against’ anything.  Secondly, to truly create an organism capable of ‘fixing’ many of our collective ills, one must include full transparency in its activities, especially financially.  I attempted to create an Audit Working Group, which would have served as a way to bring transparency to a very opaque financial allocation system, and was shot down by vested interests.  
The mathematics of Occupy were studied by many, and its execution was used previously by various black operations agents to destabilize other nation states.  These same mathematics can be used inversely to stabilize an entire nation state.  Biodiversity of our economic and political systems, combined with Open Source style transparency, can make our nation strong.  
Let’s stabilize our systems with biodiversity.  Let’s build the Future.
*III Complexity Science

Filed under III complexity science Occupy Wall Street

0 notes

Student Loans, In an Asset Class of Their Own

I know, I know, some of you are thinking, c’mon, you took out loans, now pay them back.  I dig that approach, and I am just making a capitalist argument for placing capitalism back into the valuing of student loans in the financial sector.  

Funny story; a few years back, in the 1980’s, a bunch of high level banking lobbyists pushed hard for an exception to prevent bankruptcy in student loans.  The argument goes, even if the individual turned in their degree, their brain still has the information they received.  Shockingly, the lobbyists won their case, and the effect of this asset exception on capital markets could not have been predicted; US student loans are now valued at less of a risk than the debts of first world sovereign nations.  That means that $100,000 debt of an individual American is less of a risk of default by a bank than the debt of the countries of Ireland, France, and Spain.  When the risk of issuing debt is undervalued, banks have an incentive to loan to more people.  When more loans are outstanding, this leads to inflation of such an asset class.  According to a 2010 report by the Economist magazine, the cost of state subsidized education has gone up by a factor of 14 in-state tuition, and a factor of 24 out of state in the past 40 years.  That is 1400% and 2400% increase; and this is for an education that is already state subsidized.    

My personal story, is actually wicked funny too.  I decided to get an Executive Master’s Degree in Financial Statement Analysis and Securities Valuation from Baruch College (which means I way overpaid for a public MS, $45,000 for an in-state Masters). It’s a thirty-six credit master’s degree with a curriculum that mirrors the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation, and many of us who enrolled were in banking and sought a highly focused degree that would put us in the running for a banking analyst position out of college, an industry that was doing well up until that time.  
Week two of my program, Lehman Brothers collapsed, and as we all know, the world was pulled to the brink of financial meltdown.  Almost five years later there are 40% less analysts working on Wall Street than there were at the point of enrollment.  To add insult to injury, the head of the Executive Programs at Baruch College was caught forging grades for students, so the college would not lose out on such a lucrative stream of revenue.  Tarnished degree or not, one still ‘must pay’ according to our current laws.  

Are exceptions for particular assets acceptable in a capitalist economy?  For those of us in our childbearing years, are you afraid of how much money college will cost your children?  Do you think it is time to change that which prevents our nation from being the leader of innovation we are destined to be?  I do.

Let’s Build the Future
 
*X  Reinstating Bankruptcy Protection for Student Loans

Student Loans, In an Asset Class of Their Own

I know, I know, some of you are thinking, c’mon, you took out loans, now pay them back.  I dig that approach, and I am just making a capitalist argument for placing capitalism back into the valuing of student loans in the financial sector.  
Funny story; a few years back, in the 1980’s, a bunch of high level banking lobbyists pushed hard for an exception to prevent bankruptcy in student loans.  The argument goes, even if the individual turned in their degree, their brain still has the information they received.  Shockingly, the lobbyists won their case, and the effect of this asset exception on capital markets could not have been predicted; US student loans are now valued at less of a risk than the debts of first world sovereign nations.  That means that $100,000 debt of an individual American is less of a risk of default by a bank than the debt of the countries of Ireland, France, and Spain.  When the risk of issuing debt is undervalued, banks have an incentive to loan to more people.  When more loans are outstanding, this leads to inflation of such an asset class.  According to a 2010 report by the Economist magazine, the cost of state subsidized education has gone up by a factor of 14 in-state tuition, and a factor of 24 out of state in the past 40 years.  That is 1400% and 2400% increase; and this is for an education that is already state subsidized.    
My personal story, is actually wicked funny too.  I decided to get an Executive Master’s Degree in Financial Statement Analysis and Securities Valuation from Baruch College (which means I way overpaid for a public MS, $45,000 for an in-state Masters). It’s a thirty-six credit master’s degree with a curriculum that mirrors the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation, and many of us who enrolled were in banking and sought a highly focused degree that would put us in the running for a banking analyst position out of college, an industry that was doing well up until that time.  

Week two of my program, Lehman Brothers collapsed, and as we all know, the world was pulled to the brink of financial meltdown.  Almost five years later there are 40% less analysts working on Wall Street than there were at the point of enrollment.  To add insult to injury, the head of the Executive Programs at Baruch College was caught forging grades for students, so the college would not lose out on such a lucrative stream of revenue.  Tarnished degree or not, one still ‘must pay’ according to our current laws.  
Are exceptions for particular assets acceptable in a capitalist economy?  For those of us in our childbearing years, are you afraid of how much money college will cost your children?  Do you think it is time to change that which prevents our nation from being the leader of innovation we are destined to be?  I do.
Let’s Build the Future
 
*X  Reinstating Bankruptcy Protection for Student Loans

Filed under X Bankruptcy for Student Loans Asset Exception

0 notes

I am Not an Anarchist, or Why My Tattoo Was a Bad Idea

I admit, when I dive into something, I dive way the hell in.  Ask any ex girlfriend of mine; lots of passion off the bat, but a seeming inability to commit has been the norm.  People who live at the extremes of the bell curve enjoy diving in, but I admit a year later that my anarchy tattoo was a bad idea.  I was consumed with only a tiny piece of complexity science, that of the mathematics of chaos.  Just like that science, there is order that comes from chaos.  My external life was chaotic, so I superimposed that to my political theory.  Now I have seen the light, and political theory not tied to analytical data, is so last century.  

Let’s Build the Future

*III Complexity Science

I am Not an Anarchist, or Why My Tattoo Was a Bad Idea

I admit, when I dive into something, I dive way the hell in.  Ask any ex girlfriend of mine; lots of passion off the bat, but a seeming inability to commit has been the norm.  People who live at the extremes of the bell curve enjoy diving in, but I admit a year later that my anarchy tattoo was a bad idea.  I was consumed with only a tiny piece of complexity science, that of the mathematics of chaos.  Just like that science, there is order that comes from chaos.  My external life was chaotic, so I superimposed that to my political theory.  Now I have seen the light, and political theory not tied to analytical data, is so last century.  
Let’s Build the Future

*III Complexity Science

Filed under III Not an Anarchist